Tag Archives: photography

Pearl

26 Mar

Montserrat 16

For some reason I visited the bloggers sites yesterday after reading a post. I discovered a series of photos from a photographer. They had been discarded and rediscovered. I looked through and found that several touched something in me. I sent an email as such. He said I could have some if I liked. I picked many and found my favorite, only knowing that the lady reminded me of something, several things.

The elderly woman I shall call Pearl (the name of the magazine I hope to start this August). Pearl was my grandmother, very near and dear. My other grandmother lived on an island way up north. She was a very hard worker, kind of like the lady shown. There’s a third element I’ll save for the end. Who cares about these ladies? I do. I listened to their stories over the years, over and over. I spent numerous hours within their care and guidance. That’s what happens when your mother has five children. You become the babysitter or end up at grandma’s house. I count that as a blessing!

Endless hours of coloring books, making brownies, watching cartoons, running up to the corner drugstore buying whatever you want, like candy. The other grandmother lived so far away you had to spend the summer there. Wow. I was on my own. I had to learn to cook, to fish, to milk cows, bail boats, raise the flag on the pole and take it down securely and properly with pride. Then there was church-that’s a segment by itself. You see I had no complaints growing up; I was too busy. I loved it.

I wonder about the lady in the picture. Where is she going? Is she off to the market to buy a fresh catch? Or has she just been to church and given little of her little cash worth? What story has she told her grandchildren? Does she have any? Who cares? I do. We need to care about these ladies who have weathered everything. They have little money, little things, but pride, oh yes. And stories to tell if you listen. We’ve moved away so our youth have very few elders to help them and make them feel empowered by ones that love them. Day care has walls and strange faces, at first, anyway. Family should take care of family when available. Impressions are being made on your little humans wherever you plant them. Love them good.

You see my own mother lost her husband to a tragedy while pregnant with me. What did she do? She went back to work and hired a nanny for my sister and I. They tell me I had a black nanny. I don’t remember. But possibly my brain remembers and that’s why this picture touches me. I wonder what stories she told me? I have a connection as I started out in life and it was a person of color that affected and touched me. I’m sure of it. She spent every day with me while my mother worked. That and the purse. While that woman in the picture holds onto her purse my very own grandmother had one of her own.

My beautiful Pearl clutched onto her purse with her money in it after she sold her home. She lay bedridden for many years prior but had bought and sold her home herself. She had worked her entire life and the money lay in her purse for a little while anyway. These are the threads of life in all of us. These are our connections. They’ve been there all along we just become numb through others not telling us the correct stories or are out for our money, or prevent us from getting ahead through inequality. The picture above is my Pearl, not my biologic Pearl, but the story of who we are. She had legs that took her places while my grandmother did not. But they both had the purse. And I care about that. Pearl is a great name for a magazine I think. What do you think?

You never know when inspiration will strike. And boy did it strike me yesterday. I am actually on hiatus as I’ve just released two books, one in December and the other a few weeks ago. Why am I on hiatus? From writing? Because I’m selling my home. That’s big business with going through everything from a lifetime, to cleaning, to Goodwill and beyond. Oh yeah: the windows, the gutters, the carpets must all be cleaned, and of course, the storage room and garage, too. We must make it look glorious for a prospective new home owner!

Put the sign in the yard. What for? We have the internet. Take the pet with you when you leave to show the house. Details. I’m headed for that simpler life. How on earth did I do it all?

By Caroline Clemens

Photography by APMcGrath

#pearlseries

#photocredit

#apmcgrath

#carolineclemens

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Photography

21 Dec

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Before I depart for the holidays and parties I wanted to show off, just a little, my pictures from a recent trip to the Biltmore in Asheville, North Carolina. This is a tease for a future post on the historic estate still privately owned and maintained. Incredible!

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I took the teens so they could experience something that is meaningful to me. You will need to come back and read my post to find out that answer. Stay tuned.

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I have a poetry collection available on Amazon and after I snapped this photo I couldn’t help but think about my poetry. Poetry is that inner sanctuary that not everyone writes about but when you find a poem that you like it makes you feel connected. One doesn’t have to wonder why anymore … it just is. This picture has a blind enclosure, reflection on the window, and the beauty beyond. My poetry collection is titled “Autumn Quotes” by Caroline Clemens.

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Finally, I’m a stylist now and working on the young is so easy. They already just want to shine and all I do is add a little sparkle!

Thanks for stopping by and come back in the new year. I will have a post on the Biltmore, more photography posts, and maybe some music. I should go out clubbing, that’s what the very young tell me. Who knows?

theivorytide.com

photography by me

 

Marblehead Lighthouse

7 Nov

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The Marblehead Lighthouse is the oldest lighthouse in the U.S. still in operation around the Great Lakes. It is almost 50′ tall (though another figure states 65′) and opened in 1820. It is made of limestone, likely from the nearby quarry which is between the rocky ledge on the lake and the cemetery.

Alexander Clemons bought 130 acres and settled here in 1875. Nearby is a recovery center replica that just opened in May 2016 showcasing the history of the area. Click link below for full history and beginnings.

My family and I visited the Marblehead Lighthouse last month and unfortunately for us the Keeper’s building was closed. It is open to the public and served by volunteers. My father was looking forward to seeing a picture of his grandfather in there. His grandfather’s name was Myron Clemons. He was told they have one on the wall. The Keeper’s Museum preserves the history of the lighthouse and it became a state park in 1998.

You can purchase a brick to assist in the preservation here: Marblehead Lighthouse

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The Keeper’s House was built in 1880, with 16 keeper’s and families having lived here. The U.S. Coast Guard used it for a residence hall back in 1947, but in 1968 support began to rise to preserve the old place and it was saved right before they burned it down. By June of 1998 a state park had evolved. Volunteers operate the building as info for tourists and as a museum.

 

From 13 whale oil lamps, which burned and were tended to back in 1821, to kerosene, incandescent electricity, and now to the present 20 watt green LED, it has always been about reassuring  mariners on Lake Erie. A New Zealand Company is replacing the lighthouse lights with this update of LED lighting. The time period went like this: 1921-1858 used whale oil and lard, 1858-1923 used coal oil & kerosene, 1923-2013 had incandescent electricity and 2013 to present uses LED, light emitting diode.

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I like to think this window gave a personal eye view of the lake and a small portal to look out for ships passing by. I know this job was of high importance at the time as supplies and wares were transported and traded on the seas.

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Thanks for stopping by. Sea you next time.

Photography by me

Caroline

MarbleheadLighthouse

LighthouseMuseum

 

Graveyard

28 Oct

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Posting a grave-site from Marblehead cemetery in northern Ohio, which just happens to be my father’s grandfather (my great grandfather) and also a Captain. How about that? In case you were wondering why on earth do I love the sea? Well now, it’s in my blood. And since this is the month of blood, ghosts and dead people what better than the site of granite stones to keep them there.

I’m participating in the challenge from photographer Cee. Find her below; click on the link.

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My family and I visited this cemetery and other sites in this northern coastal region recently while I was in Ohio. There are many stories to be told from the past which give us a sense of who we are and maybe why we love what we do. Follow me here on theivorytide.com for more posts about this region and the fabulous lighthouse that rests on the rocky point.

Photography by  Caroline Clemens

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